Little Emerald

Jodis lactearia (Linnaeus, 1758)

A small and delicate emerald moth, the Little Emerald is green-white when fresh, but rapidly looses some of its green colouration, and worn individuals appear whitish. The two white cross lines remain distinct even on worn moths. This species is one of the smallest of the British Emerald moths, being smaller than the Small Emerald. The caterpillar resembles a shoot, being thin and elongate, bright green in colour with reddish spots or a continous red line on the upperside and having a strongly notched head.

Little Emerald

Identification

A small and delicate emerald moth, the Little Emerald is green-white when fresh, but rapidly looses some of its green colouration, and worn individuals appear whitish. The two white cross lines remain distinct even on worn moths. This species is one of the smallest of the British Emerald moths, being smaller than the Small Emerald. The caterpillar resembles a shoot, being thin and elongate, bright green in colour with reddish spots or a continous red line on the upperside and having a strongly notched head.

ORDER

Lepidoptera

FAMILY

Geometridae

TYPE

Moths

Widespread in England and Wales, rare in Scotland. In Dorset and Somerset, the Little Emerald is widespread but thinly distributed, occurring at low abundances at most sites. At Wyke Farm, the Little Emerald is likely resident at low density in the woodlands.

The Little Emerald is most common in open woodlands and scrublands.

The larvae feed on a range of woody plants, including Blackthorn, Hazel, Hawthorn, oaks, Hornbeam, Sycamore and willows.

The adults fly from late April to early August, with a peak in numbers in June. They are most often seen attracted to light at night.

MONTHS - SEASONALITY
Jan
Feb
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LATIN NAME

Jodis lactearia

Size (MM)

Wingspan 23 - 26 mm

iucn Status
lc

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